Ann Akumu. 10/20.

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Business: Tailoring .
Location:
Molo Main Market.
Years in Operation:
9 Years.
Amount needed:
$100.

Ann Akumu is very passionate about making the best clothes for her customers whose loyalty has been unwavering for the over nine years that she has been in the tailoring business. She invests a lot of time and money in learning and bettering her skills from fellow tailors who are open to passing on their skills to others at a reasonable fee. She is happy to try out new trendy styles on dresses for herself and family first, so that when customers require them she can confidently make for them. Ann makes profits of about $6 from every dress she makes and in peak seasons she can make up to 5 dresses in a day. With her growth in skill she has also grown her clientele because in the past few years she would make profits of just $30 from each dress.

In February this year (2020), Ann moved to another building at the back entry of Molo’s main market where she has now set shop. She previously shared a building with another tailor in very limited space that otherwise curtailed her expansion plans. She has now set two other sewing machines in her shop where two young women are training with her. They each pay $150 which covers the whole period within which they are under her wing until they are good enough to make clothes on their own. She is pleased that the two students are catching on fast and will soon start to work on their own.

As businesses continue to recover from the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic, Ann’s is no exception. She is seeking $100 from Moto Hope Micro Lending to purchase fabric to stock in her shop. The money will enable her to purchase the kind of fabric that her customers demand and improve her profit earnings from each dress that she makes. When she makes a single dress for a customer who purchases fabric from her shop  she makes profits of $4 from selling fabric and $6 from making the dress taking home $10 in profit from every dress. It is these profits that enable her to cater for the school fees needs of her three school going children as well as her family’s needs especially now that her husband is out of work.

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